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20120930
20121008
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. in the senate candidate in massachusetts, scott brown and elizabeth warren. this one hour debate courtesy of the university of massachusetts, and the boston herald, moderated by david gregory. >> moderator of meet the press and welcome to the center of massachusetts co-sponsored by the university and the boston herald. i am joined by the two candidates, miss elizabeth warren and a senator scott brown. welcome to both of you. a thank you for being here. just a note about the rules, basically there are none. no set time limits. what i hope is a healthy discussion of the important issues facing this country and in this race. i can't been -- i champion the to a few -- the two of you. i would like to begin where it seems this campaign has been, in the area of the personal. some personal friction and issues between the two of you. ms. warren, i want to start with questions about your native american heritage. there seems to be a lot of questions about this. i want to see if we can clear these things up. you have listed yourself as a minority in a faculty directory in 1986. you continue to miss
brown and elizabeth warren. later, a debate for the candidates for senator in nebraska. today's newspaper features a front-page article on ross perot. we travel to the office thursday to report the interview the article is based on. now this is an hour. goo [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> ross perot, i want to know how long has it been since you have been in the public 5. >> i have been in the public five about the national debt and the country and not cause problems -- in the public eye about the national debt and the country's problems. >> has it been too long since somebody like you commanded public attention so you could get the public to understand these sorts of issues? >> i am not in a good position to say that, but we need to clearly describe what has happened and what we need to do to get this under control, and right now everybody is dancing around eight as opposed to facing it. if you have cancer, the first thing you want to do is they said. we have economic cancer at this point -- i
:00 eastern we look good to the university of massachusetts scott brown and elizabeth warren face off. he can see that here and c-span. that will be followed at 8:00 for the open senate seat in nebraska. on c-span2, eric cantor will square off for the race for california seventh district. it will be on c-span2. >> every generation there are history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children and grandchildren. we were then spending their money. we are much more spending their money. we are leaving them a mess. it to be very difficult to deal with. if we are that week, just think of who want to come here for. we're seeing our country taking over. we're so we cannot do anything. we are moving in that direction. we have got to start fixing this now. otherwise it is a disaster. we could even lose our country. >> ross perot interviewed by richard wolfe and how it has changed since he ran for president in 1992 and 1996. by his article in today's edition of "usa today" ross perot tonight on c-span at 9:00 p.m. eastern. >> of the archdiocese of washington red mass yesterday
there. ken scott brown withstand the blue tide there? -- can scott brown withstand the blue tide there? right now, the democrats are doing well. you have a candidate in indiana who succeeded the incumbent in that the primary. he is a tea party candidate. that it -- i s a -- is a tight race. you have a solid republican candidates. i was in arizona about a month ago, where democrats are competitive. it shows that these races are still fluid. you can be undecided and we can say that the race for undecided voters started yesterday. it will still be a couple of weeks before they really engaged. i do not know if people vote in races like a chess game. i do think people pick and choose. one from aisle a, one from aisle b. one thing we have not talked about is the fundamental dissatisfaction americans have with government. president, senate, congress, and governor, how do they make those choices? >> i have to agree with fred, for the most part. you look at indiana. if lugar had won his primary, i know indiana would not have been on anybody's map. that is not how it is here it is a very tight r
marshals but attorney thurgood marshall, victory in brown versus board of education. the democratic platform did not. it was eisenhower and nixon who got throughout 1957 and 1960's civil rights act over the ferocious maneuvering of lyndon b. johnson, but at that point, with thurgood marshall's victories in the supreme court and the republicans pushing through civil rights with dwight eisenhower sending federal troops to enforce marshall's victories down in little rock, um, with bill clinton's friend, orville fava, standing in the coolhouse door, that the point, the dem -- schoolhouse door, at that point, the democrats had to pretend to compare civil rights. the first civil rights legislation ever pushed by a democrat was the 1964 act, yet and still far more republicans voted for it in the house and the senate in both houses. it was about 80% republican. 60% democrat. the republicans that opposed it, opposed it for a constitutional grounds. they oppose it for every other civil rights bill. not so democrats and they weren't conservative democrats. they were liberal democrats. j. willi
's victory in brown vs. board of education. the democratic platform did not. it was eisenhower and nixon who got through the 1957 and 1960 civil rights act over the ferocious maneuvering of lyndon b. johnson. but at that point, with thurgood marshall's victories in the supreme court and the republicans pushing through civil rights with dwight eisenhower sending federal troops to enforce marshall's victories down in little rock, with bill clinton's friend, orvil favis in the schoolhouse door, the democrats out of political calculation had to pretend to care about civil rights. the first civil rights legislation ever pushed by a democrat was in 1964 act yet and still far more republicans voted for it in the house and the senate. in both houses it was about 80% republican, 60% democrat. the republicans who opposed it opposed it for constitutional grounds. they had voted for every other civil rights bill. not so the democrats and they were not conservative democrats. they were liberal democrats. j. william fullbright, bill clinton's mentor, big supporter of the u.n., albert gore sr. gore's fathe
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6